10.11.2017

How potatoes can help you fight fatigue

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Disclaimer: The following information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is for informational purposes only.

Guest post by Lucy Wyndham

According to the National Institutes of Health, up to 1 in every 5 Americans suffer from fatigue that hinders their daily lives. As draining as fatigue can be for an average person, it is even more debilitating in individuals suffering from underlying medical conditions such as fibromyalgia, myalgic encephalomyelitis or Lyme disease.

Fortunately, there are natural remedies that can help reduce fatigue. One such treatment presents itself in the form of a simple home remedy – potato water.

How potatoes can help you fight fatigue | Fed Up with Fatigue

What is potato water, and how can it reduce fatigue?

Potatoes are the No. 1 grown vegetable crop in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, making them readily available to individuals wanting to reap the benefits of potato juice. Potato water is packed full of nutrients including vitamins A, B, C, phosphorous, iron, calcium, fiber and potassium. It is within these nutrients that the secret to treating fatigue with potato water lies.

A ½ cup of potato water contains:

  • Potassium – 27% of the recommended daily amount (RDA) for adults
  • Vitamin C – more than 50% of the RDA for adults.
  • Thiamine (vitamin B1) – 20% of the RDA for adults
  • Niacin (vitamin B3) – 20% of the RDA for adults

The nutrients found in potato water are known fatigue fighters, and together they form a potent remedy that is not only safe but readily available and affordable as well. Potassium in particular is vital in keeping fatigue at bay as it ensures the proper functioning of cells and the releasing of energy into the body.

How to prepare potato water

There is more than one method to make potato water:

  1. Wash a potato, and remove all of the sprouts and green spots. Then, grate the potato, put it in a clean cloth – cheese cloth would work great for this – and squeeze out the juice. Alternatively, you can use a juicer to extract the juice.
  2. The next time you boil potatoes, retain the water and consume it.
  3. Finely chop a clean, unpeeled potato. Soak it in a glass of water overnight, then drink the water.

One caution

Lucy Wyndham

Although the benefits of potato water are undeniable, it is important to not use potatoes that are green in color or are sprouting as these parts contain solanine, which can cause severe nausea and diarrhea.

If you don’t like the idea of consuming plain potato water, you can use it as a base for other drinks. Mixing the juice from one potato, one carrot and one apple together makes for a refreshing drink which is great at getting rid of fatigue.

Lucy Wyndham spent over a decade working as a nutritionist before taking a step back to indulge her love of writing and spending more time with her young family.

Editor’s notes

I had someone ask, “Why not just eat potatoes?” I was curious about that myself, so I did a little online research and learned potatoes lose nutrients as they cook. If you were boiling them, then those nutrients would leach into the water. That explains why potato water has a better nutrient profile than cooked potatoes.

I also wanted to point out potatoes are nightshade vegetables. In certain people who are sensitive to nightshades, potatoes could potentially increase pain and inflammation in the body.

Like every other treatment, some things work for certain people and not others. This is the unfortunate reality of fibro, chronic Lyme and similar conditions.

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Comments

  1. Kathy Madore says:

    If you have not had a raw potato try it, I bet it would be better than drinking the juice. I was raised in Northern Maine where we grew potatoes and ate them raw too.

  2. I really enjoy reading the articles in Fed Up With Fatigue. Now and then I want to comment but I don’t know if the comments are only for subscribers or if anyone can see them. Anyone know how that works?

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